Charles Darwin was a martyr to ill-health all his life, and was patiently nursed by his wife Emma, whom he called ‘Mammy’ (The Spectator)

Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution marks a unique turning point for both the natural and social sciences. His works do not only provide essential resources to understanding life through the lens of scientific observation, but a new language for describing life in scientific and political theory. His writings drew inspiration from a wide range of thinkers, and have consequently been interpreted and read in contrasting ways. On one hand, his works are primarily scientific and explanatory in nature, by which a mechanistic outlook becomes central. On the other hand, Darwin remains in awe at the complexity, vastness and directedness of…


The stock market crash of 1929 marks an abrupt end to the United States’ roaring twenties, which is characterised by a decade of consumption and industrial growth. Following the stock market crash in 1929, the economy suffered from a decline in economic activity, as output and consumption levels fell significantly. 29% of the country’s real GNP disappeared between 1929–1933, while consumption fell by 18%. The subsequent period of economic contraction has been considered by some as a direct consequence of the crash. Others, however, have attributed the recession to the failure of financial markets in providing necessary credit and liquidity…


Photo by Simon Migaj on Unsplash

Meditation has been studied and cited widely by researchers as an effective relief for the stresses of modern living. The rising popularity of meditation is an encouraging trend, as mental and physical wellbeing is increasingly discussed.

However, people are often misguided into thinking of meditation as a cure to all our problems, and a vehicle to achieving individual success. Such narratives are highly visible across mainstream media, youtube channels, and business publications in particular. These representations perpetuate unhealthy expectations and impose highly self-centred values on the very thing that is defined by openness, acceptance and non-judgement.

Meditation Is Not A…


This piece reflects on the legacy of rational choice thinking and analyses the way it transformed and redefined political liberalism.

Political liberalism underwent drastic transformations at the height of the Cold War, recasting itself along rationalist lines to cope with the demands of an intensifying ideological struggle and nuclear arms race.[1] The rationalist approach has since established itself as a dominating form of liberalism that is popularised and adopted widely across academic disciplines and governing institutions. This essay seeks to evaluate influences that the two key assumptions of rational choice theory, namely methodological individualism and instrumental rationality, exert on political…


This is an unpublished interview with Sir Mark Lyall Grant, UK’s former National Security Advisor and Ambassador to the United Nations. The interview was conducted following a talk he gave at University of Warwick on 30 January 2018, and was originally produced for The Warwick Globalist. This is the second half of a two part series. If you would like to access the first half of the interview, click here.

Sir Mark Lyall Grant previously served as Theresa May’s national security advisor and the UK’s ambassador to the United Nations. (United Nations)

Pak: What is, the most memorable or proudest moment in your career so far?

Sir Mark: Well there are many episodes that I’m very proud of, some that I’m less…


Sir Mark Lyall Grant was UK’s National Security Advisor (2015–17) and Ambassador to the United Nations (2009–15). He qualified as a Barrister before joining the diplomatic service in 1980. Over the next 35 years, he served in Pakistan, France, South Africa and the US as well as holding numerous positions in the FCO and Cabinet Office in London. He was also High Commissioner to Pakistan (2003–06) and Political Director in the FCO (2007–09).

This interview was conducted following a talk Sir Mark gave at University of Warwick on 30 January 2018. The interview was originally produced for The Warwick Globalist…


Following a visit to British Museum’s exhibition on Edvard Munch: Love and Angst, I reflect upon the emotionally impactful display of Munch’s personal grief.

As you walk into the inner world of Edvard Munch, the man who created The Scream, it’s hard to miss the heart wrenching representations of life that permeate his early works. Every stroke on the canvas, every dab of colour and every carving on the copper plate seems to reveal a sense of loss, despair and anxiety. For many of us, the “apocalyptic masterpieces” he created symbolises the epitome of artistic expression. …

Brian Pak

Navigating life through arts, culture, philosophy, politics, tech and entrepreneurship. Follow my latest work at https://www.linkedin.com/in/pakbrian/!

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